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When Did the Anthropocene Actually Begin?

Invasive species introduced by humans to new regions can also be markers, the scientists said. The inadvertent import of alien species in the ballast water of ships arriving in San…

The Key to California’s Survival Is Hidden Underground

Water is urban planners’ nemesis. Because the built environment is so impervious to liquid, thanks to all that asphalt, concrete, and brick, water accumulates instead of seeping into the ground.…

2022 Wasn’t the Hottest on Record. That’s Nothing to Celebrate

Asia had its second warmest year on record. On April 30, temperatures reached 120 degrees Fahrenheit in Jacobabad, Pakistan—unseasonably early for the region. When summer came around, heat waves may…

Mass Climate Migration Is Coming

Unprecedented heat, drought, and wildfires caused chaos and misery across the once temperate British Isles this year, as climate change made its impacts felt beyond the mid-latitudes. Across the channel,…

Europe’s Plan to Become the First Climate-Neutral Continent

The European Union is sick of talking about climate change; now it wants to act. The world’s second-largest economy is attempting to become the first climate neutral continent by 2050…

Climate Enforcers Need Hard Evidence. Friederike Otto Has It

But attribution science can do a lot more than tell us how climate change influences the weather. Otto wants to use her attribution reports to hold polluters to account for…

Alaska’s Arctic Waterways Are Turning a Foreboding Orange

This story originally appeared on High Country News and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Dozens of once crystal-clear streams and rivers in Arctic Alaska are now running bright…

The Climate Struggle Literally Hit Home in 2022

That transition to an all-electric life—no more gas stoves or water heaters, either—will also create jobs. One estimate reckons that the IRA will create nearly a million per year over a decade.…

You Don’t Need to Fear a World of Eight Billion Humans

On November 15, the 8 billionth person on the planet was born. Well, more or less. That was the date selected by United Nations demographers as the moment the world crossed…

El Niño Is Coming—and the World Isn’t Prepared

In 2023, the relentless increase in global heating will continue, bringing ever more disruptive weather that is the signature calling card of accelerating climate breakdown.  According to NASA, 2022 was…

This Christmas, It’s ‘Firmageddon’ as Climate Change Hits Oregon

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Scientists have discovered a record number of dead fir trees in Oregon, a foreboding sign…

Wine Is Getting Pricier Thanks to a Logistical Nightmare

A fine wine can be a lot of things: oaky, fruit-forward, maybe even chewy. But wines of recent vintage also have the bouquet of a logistical nightmare, due to a…

The Great Carbon Con Is Coming to an End

A year after COP26, the United Nations Climate Change Conference which took place in November 2021, the number of FTSE 100 companies vowing to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 grew…

The Quest to Defuse Guyana’s Carbon Bomb

In March 2015, the Deepwater Champion rig was at work for Exxon Mobil, exploring for oil in the Atlantic Ocean 120 miles off the coast of Guyana, drilling below 6,000…

The ‘30×30’ Conservation Goal Divides and Inspires at COP15

But others question the mentality of those trying to enforce it—even if it looks good on paper. Lakpa Nuri Sherpa, who is from Nepal, and represents the Asia Indigenous Peoples…

Storytelling Will Save the Earth

Picture the world 4.4°C hotter than preindustrial levels by the end of this century. That was one of the IPCC’s sixth assessment report predictions for scenarios with either unabated emissions…

Bio-Based Plastics Aim to Capture Carbon. But at What Cost?

It’s the year 2050, and humanity has made huge progress in decarbonizing. That’s thanks in large part to the negligible price of solar and wind power, which was cratering even back…

A New EU Rule Can Expose Greenwashers

In 2023, all companies listed on regulated markets in the European Union will begin applying the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD), a new rule that will require them to publish,…

The Grim Origins of an Ominous Methane Surge

That is, as we polluted less—heavy industry spun down, flights got canceled, people stopped commuting—we also produced less of the pollutant that normally breaks down methane. It’s a second unfortunate…

Pink Snow Is Not a Cute Phenomenon—Here’s Why

The scientists used the device to record the snow’s albedo, a measure of what fraction of the sunlight beaming down is reflected back up. Red snow means lower albedo, which…

The Extraordinary Shelf Life of the Deep Sea Sandwiches

In the late 1960s, a submersible named Alvin suffered a mishap off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard. The bulbous white vessel, holding a crew of three, was being lowered for a…

Americans Are Moving Into Danger Zones

Clark also found that Americans are moving away from places prone to fleeting heat waves, like the Midwest, yet are flocking to areas with consistently higher summer heat, like the…

The Mystery of Alaska’s Disappearing Whales

This story originally appeared in Undark and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When Roswell Schaeffer Sr. was 8 years old, his father decided it was about time he…

Pliocene-Like Monsoons Are Returning to the American Southwest

Leaf waxes also predate climate records from Antarctic ice cores, which go back only about a million years and require a climate that can support ice. One study used leaf waxes to…

The Planet Desperately Needs That UN Plastics Treaty

This week in Uruguay, scientists, environmentalists, and government representatives—and, of course, lobbyists—are gathering to begin negotiations on a United Nations treaty on plastics. It’s only the start of talks, so we…